Direct + Indirect Qi Flow:
Is One More Powerful?

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Moving Qi in the Body and Dragon & Tiger Medical Qi Gong

There are two methods of moving qi energy in the body: direct and indirect. Indirect movement of qi is what occurs in practice of Dragon and Tiger Qi Gong when the hand makes contact with the etheric field, which causes an energetic jump in the wei qi (found just under the skin).

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Are You Relaxed or Collapsed?

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Improve Posture in Sitting Qi Gong + Sitting Meditation

An important aspect of sitting qi gong and meditation is the posture you hold during practice. Proper posture makes it possible for your body to relax, open up and let go, whereas poor alignments lock tension in your body and mind. Like all Tao arts training, the process of improving your posture takes place over time, as you become more comfortable sitting and make small yet significant adjustments. As you do, you gain access to the deeper tensions in your body, so you can release them once and for all.

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Follow Your Heart:
Healing from Cardiovascular Disease with Qi Gong Exercise

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energy-exercise-therapyCardiovascular diseases (CVDs) include hypertension (high blood pressure), coronary heart disease (heart attacks), cerebrovascular disease, peripheral artery disease, rheumatic heart disease, congenital heart disease and heart failure.

Heart Disease: Why Your Cardio Health Matters

The World Health Organization reports that “An estimated 17 million people die of CVDs, particularly heart attacks and strokes, every year”. Along with smoking, poor diet and lack of activity are among the top three primary causes.

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Qi Gong Exercise: How to Boost Heart
+ Organ Health

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Qigong Exercises for the Heart + Other Internal Organs

Qi Gong Exercises for a Healthy Heart

All Tao energy arts focus on the internal organs since they are critical to our survival and the health we experience in our lifetime—they are what makes us tick. If you lose a limb, as long as you stop the bleeding, you will survive. In fact, you could lose all four limbs and still live but, if you lose an organ—say your heart, spleen or liver—your life will come to an abrupt and decisive end. The simple fact is that it’s not your muscles or limbs that perpetuate your life, but rather your internal organs. Western exercise methods emphasise developing muscle power, shape and tone—that which makes us look good from the outside.

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Tai Chi Yields, Bagua Changes

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Tai Chi + Bagua Master Bruce Franztis with Senior Instructor Paul Cavel

Tai Chi + Bagua Master Bruce Franztis with Senior Instructor Paul Cavel

Although both tai chi and bagua develop softness and strength, each individual student is typically drawn to one side. Most people are either more yin or more yang in their personalities and approach to life. In the West, we naturally gravitate towards our strengths, which means we tend to develop that which is dominant in us and leave behind anything that is lacking or weak. This can create further imbalance—the opposite of what tai chi and bagua practice aims to achieve. Training tai chi helps you develop softness inside bagua, while training bagua helps create more flexibility in tai chi. In turn, greater flexibility from bagua further allows you to access a softer operation of tai chi, while a softer execution of tai chi allows you to generate more strength in bagua. This positive feedback loop continues on many levels throughout your practice over years and decades as you refine and hone your skills on ever-deeper layers.

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