Are You Relaxed or Collapsed?

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Improve Posture in Sitting Qi Gong + Sitting Meditation

An important aspect of sitting qi gong and meditation is the posture you hold during practice. Proper posture makes it possible for your body to relax, open up and let go, whereas poor alignments lock tension in your body and mind. Like all Tao arts training, the process of improving your posture takes place over time, as you become more comfortable sitting and make small yet significant adjustments. As you do, you gain access to the deeper tensions in your body, so you can release them once and for all.

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Opening or Letting Go:
How Do You Know?

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Pulsing Techniques to Open the Body

Pulsing Techniques to Open the Body

Throughout the years, I’ve been asked this question in various forms, and I’ve come to realise that many students who ask it have often reached quite a profound level of practice. Of course, as with any Tao arts training, the answer lies in developing your skill with ever-more refined nei gong techniques, self-reflection and ongoing meditation practice.

To Control or Not to Control,
That Is the Question

The short answer to the question is that opening entails exerting some level of control while letting go does not. To consider the quality of difference yet deeper, we can look to the nei gong from which opening and letting go derive and how each are applied in practice.

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Follow Your Heart:
Healing from Cardiovascular Disease with Qi Gong Exercise

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energy-exercise-therapyCardiovascular diseases (CVDs) include hypertension (high blood pressure), coronary heart disease (heart attacks), cerebrovascular disease, peripheral artery disease, rheumatic heart disease, congenital heart disease and heart failure.

Heart Disease: Why Your Cardio Health Matters

The World Health Organization reports that “An estimated 17 million people die of CVDs, particularly heart attacks and strokes, every year”. Along with smoking, poor diet and lack of activity are among the top three primary causes.

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Circularity: The Heart + Soul
of Tao Meditation + Energy Arts

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Circularity in Tai Chi Circling Hands

Circularity in Tai Chi Circling Hands

Circularity is regarded as one of the primary training tenets of Tao energy arts because circular motion is the mechanism by which continuous rather than intermittent motion can be realised, giving birth to a myriad of positive health benefits. The massive gap that lies between understanding the concept of a circle or circularity as a mental construct as opposed to integrating circularity into the body’s motion is one of the main hurdles to overcome. As a result, many practitioners fall prey to visualisations and all sorts of mental gymnastics instead of actually developing and eventually embodying the true nature of circularity. For dedicated practitioners, the solution can be found by tuning into the kinesthetic of any neigong technique, that is to feel what your body does rather than what your mind thinks about it.

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Transitions: Linking Movements
into Fluid Forms

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Paul Cavel Training Wu Style Tai Chi

Paul Cavel Training Wu Style Tai Chi

From gross to subtle and big to small, transitions link form and content into cotinuous, fluid motion. Most practitioners focus on the broad strokes of the forms they practice and pay little attention to the seemingly less significant transitions that link them together. However, transitions are precisely what carries forward any momentum and qi development, making possible more profound levels of practice and supercharging power and health benefits.

On the other hand, when not executed properly, transitions can sever the momentum you build and thereby diminish and limit training results. Therefore, the wise and dedicated student hones in on the all-important linking components as a means of generating efficiency from move to move and advancing their practice.

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