The Five Elements & the I Ching: Two Realms of Heaven & Earth

Quote

Two Realms of Heaven + Earth

There are Two Realms of Heaven + Earth in Taoist Studies

The philosophical concept of Heaven and Earth encompasses many practices of both the manifest and primordial realms. As a qi gong practice, Heaven and Earth is an excellent methodology for penetrating deep into the body and bringing alive the many layers of flesh, fluids and qi; whereas, Heaven and Earth as a fundamental aspect of Taoist theory enters the realm of the cosmic, having very different implications.

This dual-aspected philosophy is not unique to Taoism, as discussed in the article from which this excerpt is derived, but the pragmatic and skilful approach of the Water method allows the Taoist seeker to evolve on all levels of their being through a systematic training protocol. Derived from study of the Five Elements and I Ching, this practice methodology offers the dedicated student of the Tao effective strategies for navigating the pitfalls of living in the modern material world, and effectively growing their personal and spiritual potential.

Continue reading

Unfolding the Eight Energies of
Tai Chi & Bagua

Quote

bagua-yin-yangAlthough many books on tai chi assign the eight internal energies of peng, ji, lu, an, lieh, tsai, kao and jou to the eight trigrams, they are not manifestations of the trigrams themselves, otherwise bagua—the art form of the I Ching—would employ that methodology. In bagua’s palm changes, all eight internal energies are used in each palm and yet each palm develops the energy of a single trigram.

Likewise, in tai chi, you stream through the eight internal energies as you practise your
form and yet your focus remains on developing the energy of a single trigram. When
practising a form or any section that is highly familiar to you, your focus is placed on the trigram of your choice, the energy behind the symbol. You then attempt to make the jump
and contact that particular primordial energy.

Continue reading

Tai Chi Yields, Bagua Changes

Quote

Tai Chi + Bagua Master Bruce Franztis with Senior Instructor Paul Cavel

Tai Chi + Bagua Master Bruce Franztis with Senior Instructor Paul Cavel

Although both tai chi and bagua develop softness and strength, each individual student is typically drawn to one side. Most people are either more yin or more yang in their personalities and approach to life. In the West, we naturally gravitate towards our strengths, which means we tend to develop that which is dominant in us and leave behind anything that is lacking or weak. This can create further imbalance—the opposite of what tai chi and bagua practice aims to achieve. Training tai chi helps you develop softness inside bagua, while training bagua helps create more flexibility in tai chi. In turn, greater flexibility from bagua further allows you to access a softer operation of tai chi, while a softer execution of tai chi allows you to generate more strength in bagua. This positive feedback loop continues on many levels throughout your practice over years and decades as you refine and hone your skills on ever-deeper layers.

Continue reading